Speakers

(Day One) Sunday 20 March 2016

7:00 - 8:45 am

Registration

Workshop #1
9:00 - 10:30 am

harvard

harvard-arb

king-su

Migrate

ksau-hs

Fundamentals of Medical Research: From Theory to Practice

Dr. Anas Khan,
(Moderator),
Assistant Professor,
Emergency & Disaster Medicine,
King Saud University,
KSA
Dr. Hesham Hamouda,
Attending Psychiatric,
Boston Children’s Hospitals,
Assistant Professor,
Harvard Medical School,
USA
Mr. Robert Starbuck,
CEO,
Migrate,
USA
Dr. Taghreed Justinia,
Asst. Professor of Health Informatics,
Regional Director IT Services,
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University,
KSA

This workshop will provide participants with basic skills necessary for successful research conduct. Topics covered include fundamentals of research, research design and methodology, how to communicate findings and write a research paper, how to conduct research on a limited budget and ethical and regulatory issues in research. The "MEETS" model for research skills development will also be discussed. This workshop targets physicians in academic and community settings; faculty, residents, fellows and medical students.

BREAK: 10:30 -10:45 am

 

Opening Ceremony (Day One) Sunday 20 March 2016

The Opening Ceremony
Tour around the coinciding exhibition hall
10:45 – 10:55 am
The National Anthem
Recitation from the Holy Quran
10:55 – 11:00 am
Welcoming remarks by the Organizers 11:00 – 11:05 am
Remarks by the Dean, College of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University 11:05 – 11:10 am
Remarks by the Chairman of Jeddah Chamber of Commerce & Industry 11:10 – 11:15 am
Remarks by H.E. Minister of Health 11:15 – 11:20 am
Honoring the sponsors by HRH the Patron of the Ceremony 11:20 – 11:30 am

(Day One) Sunday 20 March 2016

Workshop #2
1:00 - 2:30 pm

moh

emory

indiana

Developing Responsible Healthcare in Private/Public Schools: Grades K-12

Dr. Hisham Al Khashan,
(Moderator),
Undersecretary PHC,
Ministry of Health,
KSA
Dr. Scott McNabb,
Research Professor,
Emory University,
USA
Dr. Suliman Alshehri,
Director School Health,
Ministry of Health,
KSA
Dr. Lloyd Kolbe,
Emeritus Professor,
Indiana University,
USA

School health is increasingly being recognized as an important avenue for improving the health and well being of students, families, and communities. School health encompasses a broad range of categories including but not limited to health education, physical activity, nutritional environment, health services, physical environment, family engagement, and community involvement. With rising rates of non-communicable and behavioral diseases in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, there is a need to increase awareness of early preventative measures. K-12 children are especially susceptible to positive or negative health attitudes and behaviors. As such school leadership, administrators, teachers, staff, and families have a responsibility to develop lifelong, positive health-related attitudes and behaviors. Research shows participation in school breakfast and snack programs, physical education, and extracurricular activities is associated with better grades and improved test scores; this proves the interdependence of health and education. The workshop, “The Importance of Practicing Good Health in the Private and Public School System for Grades K-12” advocates for a comprehensive approach to school health in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The proposed panel, consisting of leading experts in the fields of health and education from the USA and Saudi Arabia, will explore the challenges of delivering high quality school health programs within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia as well as innovative solutions. The workshop will foster discussion and move the critical school health agenda forward.

BREAK: 2:30 - 2:45 pm

Workshop #3
2:45 - 4:00 pm


us-department-of-state

focus

commerce

hdhc

Healthcare Innovation Leadership and Entrepreneurship

Mr. Robert J. Castro,
(Moderator),
Former Chief of Staff,
Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations,
U.S. Department of State
Mr. Mohammed T. Attiah,
CEO,
Partner Focus Medical Company,
KSA
Ms. Aisha Y. Salem,
Intellectual Property Attaché, MENA,
U.S. Embassy Kuwait,
U.S. Patent & Trademark Office,
U.S. Department of Commerce,
USA
Dr. WaelKaawach,
CEO,
Healthcare Development Holding Company,
KSA

This workshop will focus on the best approach toward sustainable healthcare innovation. The workshop will introduce the innovation process, design thinking, entrepreneurship, principles of process improvement, regulatory issues, patent law, and the market forces that impact the healthcare innovation process. Also we will discuss the roles of entrepreneurs or organizations’ leaders to enable innovation to solve and advance health care by becoming aware of challenges to the quality of healthcare delivery and the opportunity for improving patient care and cost reductions, process for identifying and prioritizing real clinical problems and opportunities for innovation, developing cross-disciplinary collaboration skills, and leadership skills in advocating health systems change. Also in this workshop we will discuss the major challenges of healthcare delivery that innovator leaders and entrepreneurs facing:

  • 1. Access to know-how & networks
  • 2. Organizational expertise
  • 3. Regulatory barriers
  • 4. Access to funding & capital
END OF DAY 1

 

(Day Two) Monday 21 March 2016

7:00 - 8:30 am

Registration

Panel #1
8:30 - 9:30 am

ssha

medical-city

kfmc

seha

dhc

The Impact of Medical Cities in the Middle East Emerging Healthcare Market

Dr. Ibrahim Almilhim,
(Moderator),
Chairman,
Saudi Health Administration Society,
KSA
Dr. Abdulrahman Almuammar,
CEO,
King Saud University Medical City,
KSA
Dr. Mahmoud Yamany,
CEO,
King Fahd Medical City,
KSA
Dr. Ali AlObaidly,
Group Chief Academic Affairs Officer,
Abu Dhabi Health Services Co, (SEHA),
UAE
 
Dr. Amer A. Sharif,
CEO,
Dubai Healthcare City,
UAE
 

Emerging healthcare opportunities are mushrooming in the Gulf, with Saudi Arabia and other states planning a major expansion of medical education to upgrade treatment, improve clinical training of doctors and maximize the region's share of the booming medical tourism market. Saudi Arabia has already established a number of medical cities including King Fahd Medical City, the largest and most advanced independent medical city in the Middle East, and King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, with its College of Medicine and College of Nursing and Allied Medical Sciences.

Other medical cities include the King Abdullah Medical City in Bahrain, hosted by Arabian Gulf University, which has a focus on training doctors and sharing knowledge. UAE has developed the Dubai Healthcare City as the world's first 'healthcare free zone', allowing owners of hospitals, medical schools or recreational centers to own up to 100% of equity. UAE also built the Sheikh Khalifa Medical City in in Abu Dhabi, which has several centers of excellence. And Qatar has established the Hamad Medical City, the second-biggest healthcare development in the Middle East.

Medical cities help to enhance the quality of emerging healthcare by establishing internationally-compatible medical curriculum and exchange of know-how, as well as contributing towards raising the standards of practicing medicine. They are also key to producing much-needed doctors in greater numbers. According to World Health Statistics, the average ratio of doctors to population in the Gulf countries is 20 doctors per 10,000 people, compared to around 40 per 10,000 in Europe. The shortage of medical professionals is a worldwide phenomenon but is particularly severe in the six Gulf Co-operation Council countries: Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Oman.

BREAK: 9:30 - 9:40 am

Panel #2
9:40 - 10:40 am

who

seu

kiamrc

moh

shaura-council

imc

Improving Population Health in the Middle East: Socially Effective vs Cost Effective

Dr. Abdulwahhab Alkhamis,
(Moderator),
Assistant Professor,
Chairman,
Public Health,
Saudi Electronic University,
KSA
Prof. Salwa Alhazaa,
Shura Council Member,
Chairman and professor of Ophthalmology,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center,
Alfaisal University,
KSA
Dr. Omar Alshanqeety,
Assistant Professor,
King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre,
KSA
Dr. Noha Dashash,
Consultant,
Family Medicine,
Health Promotion,
Minister of Health,
KSA
Prof. Ahmed Mandil,
Research,
Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office,
World Health Organization,
Egypt
Dr. Walid A. Fitaihi,
Founder,
Chairman of the Board of Directors & CEO,
International Medical Center,
KSA

Limiting the growth of health care costs while improving population health is perhaps the most important and difficult challenge facing global healthcare policymakers. The role of innovation in advancing these social goals is controversial, with many seeing innovation as a major cause of cost growth and many others viewing innovation as crucial for improving the quality of patient care and innovative outcomes. Academics and professionals argue that mitigating the tension between improving health and controlling costs requires more-nuanced perspectives on innovation. More specifically, they argue that policymakers should carefully distinguish between innovative activities that are worth their social costs and activities that are not worth their social costs and try to encourage the former and discourage the latter.

BREAK: 10:40 - 10:50 am

Panel #3
10:50 - 11:50 am

tabuk

ksu-cop

kfsh

interhealth

Regulating and Supporting Regional Production of Quality Pharmaceuticals

Dr. Hisham Aljadhey,
(Moderator),
Dean & Research Chair,
King Saud University Pharmacy,
KSA
Prof. Saleh Bawazir,
Professor of Clinical Pharmacy & Consultant,
CEO,
Pharma Consult Group,
KSA
Dr. Abdullah M. Al-Mohizea,
Deputy General for Technical Affairs ,
Tabuk Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company,
KSA
 
Dr. Abdulrazaq Aljazairy,
Medical/Critical Pharmacy Department,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre,
KSA
 Dr. Rafat Taher,
CEO,
King Saud University Endowment Hospital,
Interhealth Canada,
Canada

In order to address this challenge of regulating and supporting regional production of quality pharmaceuticals, it is crucial to build and strengthen the local pharmaceutical manufacturing capacity. This requires building and strengthening of both national and regional capacity to manufacture affordable, efficacious, high-quality and safe generic essential medicines within the region, which can significantly contribute to simultaneous achievement of public health and industrial development objectives. However, the provision of safe, efficacious and quality pharmaceuticals within the region remains a major challenge due to inadequate local production of pharmaceuticals and over reliance on importation of finished pharmaceutical products and related health supplies from outside the region. That said, the key strategies to be used in achieving expected results for the regional regulation/integration in the production of quality pharmaceuticals include among others: promotion of competitive and efficient regional pharmaceutical production; facilitation of increased investment in pharmaceutical production in the region; strengthening of pharmaceutical regulatory capacity; innovative development of appropriate skills and knowledge on pharmaceutical production; utilization of World Trade Organization - Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (WTO-TRIPS) flexibilities towards improved local production of pharmaceuticals; and mainstreaming innovation, research and development within regional pharmaceutical industry.

BREAK: 11:50 - 12:00 pm

Panel #4
12:00 - 1:00 pm

kfsh

methodist

ngha

kau-hospital

moh

The Epidemiology and Preventive Strategies for Reducing Breast Cancer in Saudi Arabia

Dr. Ali Saeed Alzahrani,
(Moderator),
Senior Consultant (Epidemiologist), Executive Director,
Gulf Center for Cancer Control and Prevention, Head of Epidemiology Platform,
Command and Control Center, Ministry of Health
Principal Clinical Scientist,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center,
KSA
Dr. Barbara L. Bass,
Professor of Surgery,
Institute for Academic Medicine Full Member,
Houston Methodist Research Institute, Director,
Methodist Institute for Technology,
Innovation & Education, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston Methodist Weill Cornell Medical College
 
Dr. Muna Baslaim,
Consultant Surgeon,
Head, Breast Unit,
King Fahad General Hospital,
Jeddah,
KSA
Dr. Meteb Alfoheidi,
Breast Oncologist,
Assistant Professor,
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science- National Guard Health Affairs,
Jeddah,
KSA
Prof. Mahmoud Alahwal,
Professor of Oncology,
Breast Cancer Research Chair,
Dean,
College of Medicine,
King Abdulaziz University,
KSA
Dr. Amer Radawi,
Consultant Medical Oncologist,
Assistant Professor,
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science,
Director,
Saudi Cancer Registry,
National Guard Health Affairs,
Jeddah,
KSA
 

Over the next 5 years there will be a dramatic increase in the number of people developing cancer. Globally, 10 million new cancer patients are diagnosed each year and this will be 20 million by the year 2020. Cancer is now the public’s most feared disease. Billions of dollars are spent annually on cancer research by the drug industry, cancer charities and governments, but a cure for cancer appears elusive. And yet, we are in the midst of a revolution in our ability to image parts of the body, painlessly and in fine detail. Novel screening technologies will allow us to detect just a few cancer cells in a patient. Robotically guided destructive processes will target abnormal cells in patients long before any cancer-related symptoms develop. And all this is likely in the not too distant future. How are people, society and healthcare systems going to deal with these tremendous technological advances for cancer? Detailed information will be available in every home through easily understandable computer links. Choices now made by professionals will be equally understandable to all. Public education on health will be strengthened allowing a more critical and realistic assessment of media reports on new technologies. But as technology becomes more complex, the gap between the global rich and poor could widen. The export of unhealthy lifestyles—cigarette smoking, dietary habits and sedentary occupations will disproportionately increase cancer in many developing countries, which can least afford the treatment costs. The WHO Cancer Program is developing a strategy to identify priorities in cancer prevention, detection and treatment in a wide range of epidemiological and economic settings such as the Middle East.

PRAYER BREAK: 1:00 - 1:30 pm

Panel #5
1:30 - 2:30 pm

huntsman

hdhc

colliers

focus



Bilateral Factors Influencing Medical Tourism: A Growing/Aging Population and the Rise of Healthcare Costs

Dr. WaelKaawach,
( Moderator),
CEO,
Healthcare Development Holding Company,
KSA
 
Mr. Mansoor Ahmed,
Studies Director,
Collier International,
UAE
Ms. Paige Peterson,
Executive Vice President,
Huntsman Cancer Foundation,
Member of Board of Directors,
National Council on U.S. Arab Relations,
USA
Mr. Mohammed T. Attiah,
CEO, Partner,
Focus Medical Company,
KSA
Mr. Robert J. Castro,
Former Chief of Staff,
Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations,
U.S. Department of State,
USA

The global growth in the flow of patients and health professionals as well as medical technology, capital funding and regulatory regimes across national borders has given rise to new patterns of consumption and production of healthcare services/devices over recent decades. A significant new element of a growing trade in healthcare has involved the movement of patients across borders in the pursuit of medical treatment and health; a phenomenon commonly termed 'medical tourism.‘ Medical tourism occurs when consumers elect to travel across international borders with the intention of receiving some form of medical treatment. This treatment may span the full range of medical services, but most commonly includes dental care, cosmetic surgery, elective surgery, and fertility treatment. There has been a shift towards patients from richer, more developed nations traveling to less developed countries to access health services, largely driven by the low-cost treatments available in the latter and helped by affordable flights and internet sources of information. By recent estimates, $55Bn in healthcare spending was exported from the US last year.

BREAK: 2:30 - 2:40 pm

Panel #6
2:40 - 3:40 pm

imc

 

 

Health Promotion

Dr. Walid A. Fitaihi,
Founder,
Chairman of the Board of Directors & CEO,
International Medical Center,
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

The cost of medical treatment in most countries around the world is on the rise, this is primarily attributed to living anunhealthy lifestyle thus leading to an increase in the number of illnesses and diseases. The continuation of living an unhealthy life would greatly contribute to the drainage of the national income, which in turn impairs most countries from providing medical treatments for their people.

Therefore, what is the ideal solution? How can we put a stop to this growing drainage?
 

BREAK: 3:40 - 5:00 pm

Panel #7
5:00 - 6:00 pm

imc

Under the Patronage of
HRH Princess Al-Anoud bint Abdullah bin Abdulrahman Al-Saud,
Spouse of the Advisor to the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques, Governor of Makkah Region
 

 

Breast Cancer Awareness (Ladies Only)

Dr. Barbara L. Bass
Professor of Surgery
Institute for Academic Medicine
Full Member, Houston Methodist Research Institute
Director, Methodist Institute for Technology, Innovation & Education
Houston Methodist Hospital
Weill Cornell Medical College

 

END OF DAY 2

 

(Day Three) Tuesday 22 March 2016

7:00 - 8:30 am

Registration

Panel #8
8:30 - 9:30 am

sagia

king-su

migrate

princess-nora

princess-nora

kfsh

The Benefits of Innovation, Technology and Knowledge Transfer Between KSA & USA

Dr. Basmah
Al-Buhairan,
(Moderator),
Managing Director,
Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority,
SAGIA,
KSA
Prof. Ahmed
Al-Barrak,
Vice Rector,
Quality, Planning & Development,
Saudi Electronic University,
Professor and Chairman,
Medical Informatics,
College of Medicine
Chairman, Health Informatics Research Chair
King Saud University,
KSA
Mr. Robert Starbuck,
CEO,
Migrate,
USA
Mr. Bassam
Al-Kharashi,
Director of Business Innovation Services,
ES Consulting,
KSA


 
Dr. Nashat Nafouri,
Chair of the Healthcare Interest Group,
Executive Officer,
Saudi Quality Council,
KSA


 
Dr. Osama
Al-Swailem,
Chief Information Officer,
Healthcare Information Technology Affairs,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre,
KSA
 

From digital networks to wearables, the healthcare industry is undergoing massive technological changes which will fundamentally change how healthcare services are delivered to patients in the future – we are arguably on the cusp of a healthcare revolution driven by a perfect storm of pressures on government-funded healthcare systems, increasing prevalence of life-stye related diseases and massive advances in technological solutions which only recently seemed futuristic yet today are within our reach. It is clear that, despite differences in our population size and healthcare structures, there is significant scope to drive increased collaboration between the USA and KSA so that we can learn from our respective experiences and expertise – from human capital to eHealth, from Obamacare to Patient Data – what are the areas where our two countries can learn most from each other and what can we do to foster increased collaboration for the benefit of our two societies?

BREAK: 9:30 - 9:40 am

Panel #9
9:40 - 10:40 am

kfsh

scfhs

kau-hospital

ksau-hs

alfaisal-univ

Supporting Standardization in Medical Education and Expanding Measures in Healthcare Practice to Reduce Medical Errors

Dr. Husein Halabi,
(Moderator),
Director of Academic Training Affairs,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center,
Jeddah,
KSA
Dr. Mohammed A. Alsultan,
Assistant Secretary General of Postgraduate Studies,
Saudi Commission for Health Specialties(SCHS),
KSA
Prof. Khalid Kattan,
Consultant Thoracic Surgery & Lung Transplant,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center;
Dean,
College of Medicine Alfaisal University,
KSA
Prof. Saad Al-Shohaib,
Professor of Medicine & Nephrology,
King Abdulaziz University;
Consultant Nephrologist,
King Abdulaziz University Hospital & International Medical Center (IMC),
KSA
Dr. Wesam Abuznadah,
Assistant Professor,
Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs,
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences,
KSA

Each year more than one million people in the U.S. alone suffer from preventable medical injuries and 100,000 die from them. As the media widely reported at the time, that’s more than died in 1998 from breast cancer, AIDS and motor vehicle accidents combined. The problem of medical errors is not due primarily to a lack of knowledge. Rather, the chief culprit is inadequate dissemination and implementation of ideas and practices we know work. Healthcare professionals and their staff are anxious to deliver safe medical procedures. When shown effective methods for changing systems to make them safer, doctors, nurses, and pharmacists eagerly and energetically embrace them. A critical mass appears now to have been reached. Indeed, it may not be hyperbole to say that a deep cultural shift on this issue is underway. At its core, this shift means redefining how to accomplish one of the basic tenets of medical practice: patient safety. The vital first step is to recognize that, as in other complex fields of science, technology, engineering, and human endeavor, errors in medicine are caused by failures in the systems and organizations that human beings build. That said, healthcare organizations, doctors’ groups, regulators, government agencies need to support healthcare standardization to ensure universal patient safety is a priority.

BREAK: 10:40 - 10:50am

Panel #10
10:50 - 11:50 am


kau-hospital

Diabetes Related Clinical Complications: The Need for Critical Review

Dr. Mohamed Haji,
Assistant Professor and Consultant Ophthalmologist,
Vitreoretinal Surgeon,
Department of Ophthalmology,
Faculty of Medicine,
King AbdulAziz University,
KSA
 
Prof. Abdulmoein Al Agha,
Professor of Pediatrics,
King Abdulaziz University,
KSA
Dr. Mohammed Al-Mekhlafi,
Assistant Professor and Consultant of Neurology and Interventional Neuroradiology,
King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah,
KSA
Dr. Hala Hisham Mosli,
Professor of Medicine,
Endocrinologist,
King Abdulaziz University Hospital,
KSA

Saudi Arabia and two of the Gulf countries are among the top 10 countries reporting highest prevalence rates of diabetes mellitus worldwide. Saudi Arabia was ranked with the 7th highest prevalence of diabetes with a prevalence rate of 20.0%. Saudi Arabia has 14,900 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus,by far the highest number in the region, and 4 million with type 2 diabetesmellitus.Diabetic foot complications can be considered as a good model for other long-term complications that needs critical review. Our presentation will review the current situation of diabetesmellitus and diabetic foot complications in Saudi Arabia and forecast the future.

BREAK: 11:50 - 12:00pm

Panel #11
12:00 - 1:00 pm

kfsh

who

us-chamber

shaura-council

al faisal

kau-hospital

Encouraging Preventive Care in Saudi Arabia to Improve Quality of Care and Reduce Cost

Dr. Ali Alzahrani,
(Moderator),
Scientist & Head, Molecular Endocrinology Section,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center,
Professor of Medicine and Endocrinology,
AlFaisal University,
KSA
Prof. Lubna Alansari,
Member,
Shura Council,
Professor of Family Medicine,
Member,
Shura Council,
KSA
Prof. Ahmed Mandil,
Coordinator, Research Development & Innovation,
Regional World Health Organization,
Egypt
Ms. Catherine Mellor,
Executive Director/Global Health,
US Chamber of Commerce,
USA
Dr. Hany Hafez,
Consultant Vascular Surgeon,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital,
KSA
Dr. Sultan H. Alamri,
Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Consultant in Geriatrics,
Department of Family Medicine,
Faculty of Medicine,
King Abdulaziz University,
KSA
 

Experts in the healthcare sector expect the demand for preventive medical care and products to increase by 100 percent in Saudi Arabia. They estimate the value of the market at SR11 billion (USD 3bn), of which the western region accounts for about 40 percent. The demand is expected to rise for preventive medical care and products with the value of imports from these products at SR7 billion (USD 2bn). These items usually represent only 10 percent of stocks in pharmacies, but have now become the most sought-after items by the elderly, pregnant women, children and asthma patients who currently represent the largest percentage of consumer buyers of preventive medicines and medical products. Demand for preventive products has also increased by more than 200 percent from hospitals, polyclinics and pharmacies. The urban expansion and an increase in per capita income in the Gulf countries has led to an increase in the consumption of an unbalanced diet, coupled with a sedentary lifestyle. This, in turn, has led to the spread of the so-called lifestyle diseases, such as diabetes and heart diseases which can be controlled through preventive care practices. Chronic diseases are, by far, the leading cause of mortality in the world, representing 63 percent of all deaths. The increasing cost of treatment for diabetes and other chronic diseases is expected to compel a more intense focus on disease education and prevention by governments and health care practitioners.

PRAYER BREAK: 1:00 - 1:30pm

Panel #12
1:30 - 2:30 pm

king-su

sasem

kfmc

salamh

emory

Creating Innovative “Roadblocks” to the Increasing Incidence of Disability and Death due to Road Accidents

Dr. Anas Khan,
(Moderator),
Assistant Professor, Emergency & Disaster Medicine,
King Saud University,
KSA
Dr. Ahmed Wazzan,
President,
Saudi Emergency Medicine Society,
Assistant Professor,
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science,
National Guard Health Affairs,
KSA
Dr. Ahmed Aboabat,
Rehabilitation Consultant,
Executive,
King Fahad Medical City,
KSA
Eng. Sultan Alzahrani,
Deputy,
Saudi Society for Traffic Safety,
KSA
Dr. Scott McNabb,
Research Professor,
Emory University,
USA

Globally, every 30 seconds a person is killed in a road crash - more than 3300 per day - and over 1.2 million people per year dying in road crashes worldwide. As many as 50 million are injured every year. More than eighty five per cent of the road traffic deaths and injuries occur in emerging market countries, yet they own only some 40 per cent of the world's motor vehicles. The World Health Organization (WHO) forecasts that by 2020 road crashes will be the third most common cause of premature death in the world. In many Asian, African, and Middle Eastern countries between 40 and 50 per cent of people killed as a result of a road crash are pedestrians. The International Road Federation's world road statistics found that five countries in the Middle East are among the highest road traffic death rates in the world: United Arab Emirates, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Kuwait all had more than 18 deaths per 100 000 people. As the countries of the Middle East motorize, their death rates will inevitably rise. That said, public health officials, road traffic designers, legislators, and the police should implement proved effective and innovative measures to lower the terrible toll of motor vehicle fatalities in the Middle East.

BREAK: 2:30 - 2:40pm

Panel #13
2:40 - 3:40 pm

kfsh

moh

qassim

who

ksau-hs

Challenges in Health Information Infrastructure that Affect Patient Data Collection and Decision Making

Dr. Taghreed Justinia,
(Moderator),
Asst. Professor of Health Informatics,
Regional Director IT Services,
King Saud bin Abdulaziz University,
KSA
Mr. Mansour Al Swaidan,
Deputy,
Information and Communication Technology,
Ministry of Health,
KSA
Dr. Sulaiman Almutairi,
Informatician, Lecturer,
Qassim University,
KSA
 
Mr. Faisal Alshammari,
Senior Health Informatics Analyst,
King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center,
KSA
Mr. Hani Farouk,
eHealth,
Regional World Health Organization,
Egypt

The lack of an information infrastructure to facilitate the conducting and rapid dissemination of relevant research present a major challenge to patient care and safety. Most hospitals lack an information infrastructure to use/analyze evidence at the point of care. Because of the absence of a health data collection system, patient policy and public health decisions that can affect the outcome of a clinical diagnosis become delayed which could otherwise rapidly assess and avert serious public health threats had there been access to a data bank of information. To date, the organizational, financial, legal, technical, and operational challenges of creating and sustaining health information infrastructure have been highly variable and technically idiosyncratic and have yet to produce sustainable business models that could be used in universal applications. To accelerate the growth of regional, or global, health information infrastructure, a more uniform and cost-effective approach is needed. As these infrastructure solutions evolve, these entities, or health information systems could provide critical data sources to accelerate the dissemination of health research. If done successfully, these databases could, over time, reduce the reliance on administrative data sets. While legal and operational policies are needed to oversee the use of these databases, both the private and public sectors will need to work together to determine appropriate requirements for confidentiality, informed consent, approved uses, technological and innovative applications and appropriate access fees.

Closing Session
3:40 pm

us-chamber
CLOSING REMARKS
MR. STEVE LUTES,
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, U.S.-GCC BUSINESS INITIATIVE,
DIRECTOR, MIDDLE EAST AFFAIRS,
U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

END OF DAY 3 / END OF SAUDI INTERNATIONAL HEALTHCARE FORUM